Green Dots

A green dot symbolizes a single moment in time that can be used to end perpetration or support victims of power-based personal violence. Through your words, choices, and actions in any given moment, you can add a green dot to our map–interrupting a potential incidence of power-based personal violence, or a red dot–and make a difference. Adding a green dot will increase community safety for everyone. If each of us adds 1 or 2 or 5 or 100 green dots, we will reduce the perpetration of violence–one green dot at a time.

Green dots are divided into two categories: proactive and reactive. Proactive green dots are things people can do to prevent power-based personal violence from happening; reactive green dots are things people can do to intervene in a red dot situation. You may find examples of proactive and reactive green dots below. To access a list of green dots for specific populations, hover over the What’s Your Green Dot? tab at the top of the page.

Proactive Green Dots:

  • Have conversations about ending power-based personal violence with your friends
  • Wear a green dot button one day this week, and explain to at least on person what it means.
  • Do a paper or class class assignment on power-based personal violence prevention
  • Look out for friends at parties, bars, online, and in other high-risk situations
  • Attend power-based personal violence prevention events
  • Believe that power-based personal violence is unacceptable and say it out loud
  • Work to bring an education program to your class, group, team or organization
  • Volunteer with your local service providers
  • Check in with friends if you are concerned about their safety and connect them to help
  • Put green dot information on your Facebook page and your email signature line
  • Tell other people about your green dots
  • Talk about green dots to one new person each week
  • Talk to a male friend of yours about the importance of men getting involved in violence prevention.
  • Attend the next Green Dot Bystander Training.
  • Recommend to 2-3 of your friends that they attend the next Green Dot Bystander Training.
  • Put a Green Dot on your team uniform, and explain what it is at halftime or in fliers that attendees get when they come to the game.
  • Write an article or letter to the editor of the Battalion expressing your opinion about violence-prevention efforts and/or student involvement.
  • Ask a Green Dot facilitator to come to your class or group/team meeting to explain how you and your classmates/teammates can become active bystanders in violence prevention.
  • Talk to a leader in a student organization that you are involved in and recommend that the membership take the Green Dot Bystander Training.
  • Talk to a female friend about the importance of women getting involved in violence prevention.
  • Post a message on Facebook about a Green Dot you did, a training you attended, or any other statement of support.

Reactive Green Dots:

  • If I suspect that my friend has been drugged, I seek professional help.
  • If I saw someone who was intoxicated left behind by her/his friends, I would tell them to take her/him with them.
  • If I suspect that my friend is in an abusive relationship, I ask her/him and provide information about resources available.
  • If I suspect a friend has been sexually assaulted, I let her/him know I am here if they want to talk.
  • If I hear someone yelling and fighting, I call 911.
  • If I see someone spike another person’s drink, I stop them and call police or get someone else to.
  • If I see a friend or stranger grab, push or insult another person, I say something, go get help or get someone else to.
  • If I see a friend take an intoxicated person up the stairs, I stop and ask what is going on or create a distraction to interrupt the situation.
  • If someone appears upset, I ask if they are okay.
  • If I notice someone has a large bruise, I ask how they were hurt.
  • I talk to my friends about consent, and how he or she should wait until their partner verbalizes his/her feelings.
  • If I choose to leave a party early, I account for the people I came with.
  • If I see two men dragging a woman into a room, I call for help and intervene.
  • I will offer to watch my friends’ drinks when they leave the table.
  • If I know or suspect that a friend is in an abusive relationship (physically, sexually, or emotionally), I tell them they can confide in me.
  • I share statistics with my friends about power-based personal violence.
  • If someone needs my help and I don’t have the answer, I tap my resources and find someone who does.
  • If I hear that someone is in a bedroom “in training,” I call 911.
  • I go investigate if I am awakened at night by someone calling for help.
  • If I see someone at a party who has had too much to drink, I ask them if they need to be walked home so they can go to sleep.
  • If a woman is being shoved or yelled at by a man, I ask her if she needs help.
  • If a man is being shoved or harassed by others, I ask him if he needs help.
  • If I hear what sounds like yelling and fighting through my dorm walls, I knock on the door to see if everything is ok.
  • If I hear what sounds like yelling or fighting through my dorm or apartment walls, I talk with a resident advisor or someone else who can help.
  • If I hear an acquaintance talking about forcing someone to have sex with them, I speak up against it and express concern for the person who was forced.
  • I will say something to a person whose drink I saw spiked with a drug even if I didn’t know them.
  • Grab someone else’s cup and pour their drink out if I saw that someone slipped something into it.
  • Call a rape crisis center for help if a friend, acquaintance, or stranger told me they were sexually assaulted.
  • Confront friends who make excuses for abusive behavior by others.
  • Speak up if I hear someone say “s/he deserved to be raped.”
  • I see a couple, whether I know them or not, in a heated argument. One’s fist is clenched and the partner looks upset. I ask if everything is ok.
  • If I know information about an incident of sexual violence, I tell authorities what I know in case it is helpful